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News Nonprofit Matters: Shorter name, wider mission for homeless agency

Nonprofit Matters: Shorter name, wider mission for homeless agency

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Day Resource Center for the Homeless has shortened its name and adopted a new service approach that extends its services for people facing homelessness.

Now called DRC, the 16-year-old agency located in East Fort Worth is expanding its service structure with the Housing First approach, which places individuals or families in housing as quickly as possible, then provides support services to help them remain housed.

The nonprofit’s new model also encourages collaboration among funders and service providers, one of several recommendations of the 2014 City of Fort Worth ad hoc committee report on ending homelessness.

Co-location agreements, for example, rotate DRC specialists through offices of partner agencies such as YWCA Fort Worth & Tarrant County and Community Crossroads.

DRC social services and day shelter staff will continue to provide services at the agency shelter, located at 1415 E. Lancaster Ave., as long as needed. It will continue its partnership with 22 local churches that offer shelter through the Room in the Inn program for men or women facing homelessness, according to Executive Director Bruce Frankel.

DRC serves more than 3,000 people a year and an average of 350 people each day.

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT SOCIETY

MARKS 100 YEARS IN TEXAS

The Texas Society of CPAs, a professional organization representing Texas certified public accountants, is celebrating its 100th anniversary and accounting as a certified and licensed profession in Texas for the past century.

The Legislature created the Texas State Board of Public Accountancy in 1915 as a regulatory agency to oversee the examination and certification of accountants in Texas. That same year, TSCPA was created and hosted its first meeting in Fort Worth with 16 members. Today, TSCPA has 20 chapters across the state and nearly 28,000 members.

“We are 100 years strong and growing, and it’s an honor to celebrate the milestones and individuals who have significantly contributed to our profession and have sustained this long-lived organization,” said TSCPA Chairman Allyson B. Baumeister, a partner at Sanford, Baumeister & Frazier LLP in Fort Worth.

COWGIRL HALL OF FAME ADDS 4,

CELEBRATES 40TH ANNIVERSARY

The National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame will honor four trailblazing women during the annual induction ceremony Nov. 5 at the Will Rogers Memorial Center Round Up Inn in Fort Worth.

This year’s induction luncheon will mark the 40th anniversary of the Hall of Fame, which honors and preserves the history and impact of Western women from the mid-1800s to the present day.

The four new cowgirl inductees this year are Jane Pattie, an award-winning Fort Worth Western writer and photographer whose work often focuses on iconic cowgirls and the roles they played in the history of the West; Patricia E. Kelly, a former U.S. Marine, philanthropic leader and equestrian trailblazer; Terri Kelly Moyers, a New Mexico artist known specifically for depictions of horses; and Florida rancher Jo Ann Smith, the first female president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the founding chairman of the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board, and President George H.W. Bush’s appointee as assistant secretary of marketing and inspection of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The ceremony also will honor clothing designer Double D Ranch of Yoakum, Texas, with the Mary Jane Colter Award, given to women who “create, design, build and interpret the traditions of the American West.”

For tickets or information, visit www.cowgirl.net or call 817-336-4475.

SAFEHAVEN HONORS 15 WOMEN

SafeHaven of Tarrant County will recognize 15 local women for their accomplishments in the arts, business, education, health and human services, and volunteerism at the 23rd annual Legacy of Women awards luncheon on Oct. 1 at the Renaissance Worthington Fort Worth Hotel.

The 2015 honorees are: Heather Simmons, Creative Arts Theatre & School; Rose Pearson, Circle Theatre; Lee Koch, Arts Council Northeast; Letatia Teykl, Southwest Bank; Marilyn Gilbert, Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce; Robin Burrill, Curb Appeal Renovations Inc.; Anita Copeland, Arlington Independent School District; Cathy Sewell, Everman Independent School District; Erin Stansberger, Saginaw Independent School District; Andrea Wilson, Mission Metroplex Inc.; Susan Garnett, MHMR of Tarrant County; Lisa Rosa, Project Hand Up/The Gatehouse; and Barbara Thompson-Beaucham, Dr. Karen Barlow and Tammy Nakamura, community volunteers.

Guest speaker for the luncheon will be Jennifer Siebel Newsom, filmmaker, advocate for women and girls, and founder and CEO of Miss Representation.org.

For ticket and sponsorship information, visit www.safehaventc.org or call 817-535-6462, ext. 106.

ARTS ORGANIZATION REBRANDS

Texas Boys Choir Inc., a Fort Worth organization supporting youth development through arts education, has formally changed its name to Texas Center for Arts + Academics (TXCAA) to more accurately reflect its role in the North Texas arts community.

Clint Riley, executive director, says the name change came as a result of confusion about the organization and its schools and conservatories.

“We found that when people thought of TBC Inc., they only thought of the young men in robes who sing in our prestigious choir. Though we are extremely proud of the choir and its accomplishments, our organization exists to fulfill an even larger purpose,” Riley said.

In addition to Texas Boys Choir, Texas Center for Arts + Academics also encompasses the Fort Worth Academy of Fine Arts and the Texas School of the Arts as well as the newly formed Texas Dance Conservatory, which is opening this fall.

AND THE FUNDING GOES TO…

YWCA Fort Worth & Tarrant County received a $10,000 grant from Wells Fargo to provide financial education and coaching for women and families participating in the agency’s housing programs and child development centers. The YWCA also received a $50,000 grant from Women Inspiring Philanthropy to provide career training scholarships for homeless and low-income clients in Arlington. … The city of Fort Worth Human Relations Commission received a $10,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association. The Latino Americans: 500 Years of History grant will allow the HRC to host public programming such as film screenings, discussions groups, oral history initiatives, local history exhibitions or performances about Latino history and culture. … Lena Pope’s Chapel Hill Academy received a grant from The Ryan Foundation to buy 2,500 books for its library. When students return to school this fall, they will be able to check out a library book and take it home for the first time. … The inaugural Texas Oncology Foundation Golf Classic on June 15 at Trophy Club Country Club raised more than $90,000 in support of programs that offer encouragement and assistance to cancer patients. … Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Fort Worth unveiled a new game room June 24, thanks to a $16,500 Triple Play grant from Amerigroup Foundation. … Lockheed Martin’s AERO Club, an employee-run charity, delivered 13 grants totaling $245,000 to area agencies serving health, children, families and housing needs. With this round of grants, the charity has supported local needs with more than $650,000 so far this year. … The Texas Medical Association’s Be Wise-Immunize program awarded grants totaling nearly $18,000 to eight communities across Texas, including $1,900 to Christ’s Family Clinic for flu vaccinations at a fall flu clinic in Dallas-Fort Worth and $2,500 to Mercy Effect to provide flu vaccinations to low-income Haltom City residents at a health fair in October. … Tarleton State University will add a new leadership program, Texan Pioneer Leadership Academy, to its offerings next spring. The new program is made possible by a $150,000 grant from the Texas Pioneer Foundation to the university’s School of Criminology, Criminal Justice and Strategic Studies.

Please send nonprofit news to Betty Dillard at bdillard@bizpress.net

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