60 F
Fort Worth
Sunday, September 20, 2020
- Advertisements -
Business RadioShack's store operations executive resigns

RadioShack’s store operations executive resigns

Other News

Petalo, not Charmin: Virus brings Mexican toilet paper to US

By JOSEPH PISANI AP Retail Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Toilet...

Mall owners close to buying JC Penney out of bankruptcy

By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO AP Retail WriterNEW YORK (AP) — Mall owners Simon Property Group and Brookfield Property Partners are close to a...

At Home launches collection with Fort Worth connection

At Home Group Inc. (NYSE: HOME), The Home Décor Superstore, has debuted an exclusive collection with interior...

Former Toys ‘R’ Us reopens as Havertys in Southlake

HAVERTYS (NYSE: HVT and HVT.A) will officially open its new store in Southlake Corners on Friday, August 21, 2020. The 32,300 square...
Robert Francis
Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

NEW YORK (AP) — RadioShack, which recently announced that it plans to close up to 1,100 stores, says that Troy Risch, its executive vice president of store operations has resigned.

In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, RadioShack Corp. said that Risch resigned on Friday to pursue other interests. The retailer said Risch’s duties will temporarily be handled by other managers, effective immediately.

Last month RadioShack said that it plans to close about a fifth of its U.S. locations. The closings would leave the company with more than 4,000 U.S. stores. That’s still far more than Best Buy, which has roughly 1,400 U.S. locations, and makes RadioShack stores nearly as common as Wal-Mart locations.

RadioShack has been fighting to update its image and compete with online and discount retailers. Long known as a destination for batteries and obscure electronic parts, the company has sought to remake itself as a specialist in wireless devices and accessories. But growth in the wireless business is slowing, as more people have smartphones and see fewer reasons to upgrade.

Aside from slashing costs and shuffling management, RadioShack has been renovating its stores with a more modern look.

Shares of RadioShack gained 5 cents, or 3.5 percent, to $1.50 in premarket trading on Tuesday shortly before the market open.  

- Advertisements -
- Advertisements -

Latest News

August unemployment rate in Texas drops to 6.8%, lowest level since coronavirus shutdowns

By Mitchell Ferman, The Texas Tribune Sept. 18, 2020 "August unemployment rate in Texas...

August US home building slides 5.1% after months of gains

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. housing construction fell a surprising 5.1% in August after...

COVID-19 danger continues to drive joblessness in US

By PAUL WISEMAN AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell last...

Business owners tap into savings to withstand pandemic

By JOYCE M. ROSENBERG AP Business Writer NEW YORK (AP) — When the coronavirus outbreak...

Ariat formally announces plans for distribution center in Fort Worth

Ariat International, a footwear, apparel and accessories brand designed for equestrian sports and other outdoor activities, on Sept. 16 announced that it...