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Culture Fort Worth Art Commission changes Public Art plan

Fort Worth Art Commission changes Public Art plan

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Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

By Scott Nishimura

snishimura@bizpress.net

The Fort Worth Art Commission revised its plan for $3.6 million in public art that voters approved in May’s Fort Worth bond program, paring funding for an “iconic” prominently located artwork, and adding money for pieces in three City Council districts.

The Art Commission’s vote Aug. 5 followed criticism earlier from Council members Jungus Jordan, Sal Espino and Danny Scarth about the commission’s previous plan.

The commission:

  • Dropped proposed funding for the iconic artwork – to be selected and located in the future – to $1.4 million from $1.67 million;
  • Dropped proposed funding for a piece in the Northwest Community Park to $138,600 from $150,000;
  • Dropped proposed funding for a piece in downtown’s Heritage Park to $100,400 from $240,000;
  • Dropped proposed funding for artwork around public transit stations to $300,000 from $350,000;
  • Added in $76,000 for an artwork at the Chisholm Trail Park in Jordan’s district;
  • Added in $75,000 for a piece in Trail Drivers Park in Espino’s district;
  • Added in $300,000 for a piece at North Beach Street and Northeast Loop 820 in Scarth’s district, which lacked an allocation in the previous plan.

The Art Commission will hold public hearings Aug. 11 at the Hazel Harvey Peace Center for Neighborhoods and Sept. 8 at the Northwest Branch Library. The council is tentatively scheduled to vote on the final plan Oct. 7. Implementation of the projects is envisioned for 2015-2019.

Other proposed pieces in the draft plan:

  • Pedestrian improvements in two of the city’s urban villages to be chosen in a process led by the Planning Department, $160,000 total.
  • Como Community Center, $106,000. Art to follow Lake Como Public Art Master Plan.
  • Eugene McCray Community Center, $60,200. Work likely to be done by an emerging public artist.
  • Handley-Meadowbrook Community Center, $60,200. Also likely to be done by an emerging artist.
  • Eastside Library, East Lancaster and Oakland. $65,000. Work to follow East Lancaster Corridor Public Art Plan.
  • Far North Library, $183,000. Artwork to be commissioned in line with city’s library public art plan.
  • Fire Station 42, south Fort Worth, $91,050. Work to be commissioned with artist Tierney Malone.
  • Fire Station 43, Walsh Ranch, west Fort Worth, $91,050.
  • Downtown Public Safety and Municipal Court Building renovation, $30,000. Artwork for the lobby. More funds from the city’s Public Art Fund may be necessary for the project, Ibanez told the council.
  • City field operations service facility, way finding landmark for drop off center, $95,700.

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