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Culture Life Home and Garden Improvements That Will Benefit Local Wildlife

Home and Garden Improvements That Will Benefit Local Wildlife

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(StatePoint) When it comes to changing the world, your own backyard is a great place to start. As you make home improvements, consider their potential to benefit local wildlife that travel in and around your property.

Here are a few important steps you can take.

Plant Native Species

By planning native species exclusively in your garden and yard, you will be promoting a healthy local ecosystem while providing proper nourishment and a natural habitat for visiting wildlife, whether that be insects, birds or furry creatures. Because native plant species are meant to thrive in your local climate, they will require less maintenance, which means a beautiful yard with less stress.

Prevent Bird Strikes

You may not realize it, but your home poses a risk to birds. Window strikes are common among many species of migrating birds, and millions of wild birds are killed annually flying into windows.

However, a simple home improvement project can make your home safer for birds. Birds can see certain light frequencies that humans can’t, so by applying UV decals and UV liquid to your home’s windows and sliding glass doors, you can make windows visible to birds in a way that won’t obstruct your own view.

“Protecting birds adds beauty to your garden, is good for the environment and most importantly, saves lives,” says Spencer Schock, founder of WindowAlert, a company that offers UV decals and UV Liquid.

The UV decals and liquid from WindowAlert have been proven to effectively alter the flight path of birds to prevent window strikes. The coating will look like etched glass to the human eye, but be very visible to a bird. As UV reflectivity may fade over time, it’s important to replace the decals and liquid every four months. Application techniques can be found by visiting WindowAlert.com.

Build a Bird house

Add beauty to your yard with a wooden bird house. Find a design you love or get creative and craft your own, using your own home’s architecture for inspiration. A strategically placed bird house — either within three feet of a window or over 30 feet away — will help avoid bird strikes.

Be a good neighbor — not just to the other humans. Make improvements to your home that will help protect both local and migratory wildlife.  

Photo Credit: (c) Sharon Day / stock.Adobe.com

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