34.7 F
Fort Worth
Tuesday, December 1, 2020
Culture Life Seniors with diabetes: Important questions to ask your doctor now

Seniors with diabetes: Important questions to ask your doctor now

Other News

Rethinking Screen Time for Kids

(StatePoint) As families try to establish a new normal, balancing screen time for kids has become not only especially challenging, but more important than...

Connecting in kindness during troubling times

(BPT) - The theory that the world is interconnected to such a degree that the fluttering of a butterfly’s wing in Africa could cause...

Protecting Your Financial Health During the COVID-19 Outbreak [Video]

Sorry, but your browser does not support the video tag.(BPT) - The COVID-19 outbreak has many Americans quickly trying to adjust to a new...

Top Gardening Trends for 2020

Sorry, but your browser does not support the video tag.(BPT) - Whether you have an outdoor oasis or are a nurturing indoor plant parent,...

(BPT) – If you’re a senior with diabetes, you’re not alone. The statistics are eye opening — more than 25% of Americans age 65 and older have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. What’s more, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports diabetes as the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S.

If you’re a senior and have diabetes or help care for a loved one with diabetes, you probably have a lot of questions. Thankfully, technology has advanced incredibly over the last decade, and can now change how people manage diabetes for the better.

Building a strong relationship with your doctor is one of the best things you can do to help manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Be sure to keep an open dialogue and come with questions before any appointments. To get you started, here are three important questions you should ask your doctor.

1) What is continuous glucose monitoring and how can it help me?

People with diabetes who take insulin must monitor their blood glucose levels frequently. Uncontrolled glucose can cause health complications and even death. The traditional standard-of-care for glucose monitoring has been a blood glucose meter, which is painful and time consuming, as patients must test their blood multiple times throughout the day.

A continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system can help people with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes to track glucose levels on a continuous basis. Unlike blood glucose meters, CGMs can help eliminate painful fingerpricks and provide vital health information. CGMs are discreet, easy to use and relay a user’s glucose levels instantly to a compatible smart device or dedicated receiver, providing the direction and rate of glucose change with the touch or scan of a screen. They can help you understand the impact of physical activity and certain foods on your health and glucose levels, as well. The Dexcom G6 CGM, which is reimbursed by Medicare for eligible patients, also has an app option that gives patients the ability to share glucose information with up to 10 people who can view it through a separate Follow app.

2) How can I be more active?

Regular exercise is important for everyone, but it’s particularly important for people with diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, your cells become more sensitive to insulin when you’re active, so it works more effectively. Being active helps manage a healthy weight, which is also important.

You may think that due to your age or physical ability you can’t exercise, but talking to a physician can reveal options that fit your personal needs. Slow walks, stretching, yoga and even swimming are good, low-impact activities. Check community centers and local gyms for classes that are geared toward seniors. When beginning an exercise regimen, talk to your doctor to discuss any concerns you have and get his or her recommendations on what will work best for you in order to exercise in a safe manner.

3) How can I eat healthier?

Following a nutrition plan is an important part of managing diabetes. Patients with diabetes have extra nutritional considerations to keep insulin levels in check. Doctors can provide insight into healthy eating and explain how carbohydrates impact blood glucose levels.

You can also consider speaking with a registered dietitian to help you evaluate your eating habits and create a nutrition plan with foods you enjoy that are also complementary to a healthy diabetes lifestyle.

Let these questions help guide you to a productive conversation about diabetes with your doctors and other members of your health care team. To learn more about the Dexcom G6 real-time CGM, visit www.dexcom.com/continuous-glucose-monitoring.


close






Oh hi there 👋
It’s nice to meet you.

Sign up to receive awesome content in your inbox.

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Latest News

Susan Nix: Longtime businesswoman, TCU champion dies

Susan Appleby Nix Longtime Fort Worth business and civic leader and TCU champion Susan Appleby Nix died Thursday, Nov. 26 from complications of COVID-19. Nix,...

Classic holiday tunes get animated

The holiday stars are gone, but still animated to tune. This holiday season, musical legends Bing Crosby, Chuck Berry, Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra are returning in animated form with...

Get in the holiday mood with Carrie Underwood, Dolly Parton

Carrie Underwood, "My Gift" (Capitol Nashville) Carrie Underwood takes fans to church with her first holiday album "My Gift," a set of hymns and traditional...

Pioneer Black Canadian Cowboy John Ware honored in Stockyards

John Ware and family c. 1896. Credit: The Canadian Encyclopedia/(Courtesy Glenbow Archives/NA-263-1) The Consulate General of Canada in Texas and the Fort Worth Herd have partnered to...

Top 100: Coming to the Rescue During COIVID: Preserve the Fort, Care 4 Tarrant, United Way of Tarrant County

Leah M. King, President & Chief Executive Officer, United Way of Tarrant County Mayor Betsy Price, City of Fort Worth Judge Glen Whitley, Tarrant County Commissioners...