47 F
Fort Worth
Monday, October 26, 2020
Culture Texas attorney in Fort Worth to talk about book on Cold War...

Texas attorney in Fort Worth to talk about book on Cold War assassination, cover-up

Other News

Who killed Sweden’s prime minister? 1986 assassination of Olof Palme is finally solved – maybe

Andrew Nestingen, University of Washington It took 34 years,...

Fort Worth Police seeking man who robbed diners on Southside restaurant patio

Fort Worth Police are seeking a man who robbed diners at an outdoor patio on Hemphill Street on the city's Southside.

Authorities find 2 abducted girls after 2 boys are killed

By HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH The Associated PressMISSION, Kan. (AP) — Authorities found two girls who were abducted from a Kansas home where two...

Second whistleblower fired from Texas attorney general’s office after accusing Ken Paxton of bribery

By Emma Platoff, The Texas Tribune Oct. 22, 2020 "Second whistleblower fired from Texas...

On Aug. 8, 1993 the CIA’s station chief in the former Soviet Republic of Georgia was killed. A suspect was quickly arrested and everything seemed settled, but was it?

It sounds like something from the fictional TV show, The Americans. But it’s a true-life tale of betrayal, assassination and cover-up unearthed by Houston attorney Michael Pullara, who tells the story in his book, The Spy Who Was Left Behind.

Pullara is a Texas trial lawyer. He represents plaintiffs in complicated commercial disputes and, on a pro bono basis, individuals suing for violations of their human rights.

The Spy Who Was Left Behind is his first book.

Pullara will be in Fort Worth Thursday, April 4 at 6:30 p.m. at the Fort Worth Public Library to talk about the book.

For more on the event: http://fortworthtexas.gov/library/authorvisit/

From the Simon & Schuster website:

On August 8, 1993, a single bullet to the head killed Freddie Woodruff, the Central Intelligence Agency’s station chief in the former Soviet Republic of Georgia. Within hours, police had a suspect—a vodka-soaked village bumpkin named Anzor Sharmaidze. A tidy explanation quickly followed: It was a tragic accident. U.S. diplomats hailed Georgia’s swift work, and both countries breathed a sigh of relief.

Yet the bullet that killed Woodruff was never found and key witnesses have since retracted their testimony, saying they were beaten and forced to identify Sharmaidze. But if he didn’t do it, who did? Those who don’t buy the official explanation think the answer lies in the spy games that played out on Russia’s frontier following the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. Woodruff was an early actor in a dangerous drama. American spies were moving into newborn nations previously dominated by Soviet intelligence. Russia’s security apparatus, resentful and demoralized, was in turmoil, its nominal loyalty to a pro-Western course set by President Boris Yeltsin, shredded by hardline spooks and generals who viewed the Americans as a menace.

At the time when Woodruff was stationed there, Georgia was a den of intrigue. It had a big Russian military base and was awash with former and not-so-former Soviet agents. Shortly before Woodruff was shot, veteran CIA officer Aldrich Ames—who would soon be unmasked as a KGB mole—visited him on agency business. In short order, Woodruff would be dead and Ames, in prison for life. Buckle up, because The Spy Who Was Left Behind reveals the full-throttle, little-known thrilling tale.

For more on the book:

www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Spy-Who-Was-Left-Behind/Michael-Pullara/9781501152139

A video interview with the author:

www.spymuseum.org/multimedia/spycast/episode/the-spy-who-was-left-behind-a-conversation-with-michael-pullara/

Latest News

Senate votes to advance Barrett; confirmation expected Monday

By LISA MASCARO AP Congressional CorrespondentWASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans voted overwhelmingly Sunday to advance Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett toward...

Kamala Harris to make campaign stop in Texas

By Alex Samuels, The Texas Tribune Oct. 25, 2020 "Kamala Harris to make campaign...

What to Do: Up Against the Wall, the ‘Boys and accountants in capes

When I graduated from Paschal in 1973, I started off at then-Tarrant County Junior College (now Tarrant County College), but I hung...

El Paso officials ask residents to stay home for two weeks as COVID-19 hospitalizations surge

By Cassandra Pollock and Julián Aguilar, The Texas Tribune Oct. 25, 2020 "El Paso...

Beyond the Needle: Probability experts assess 2020 race

By DAVID BAUDER AP Media WriterNEW YORK (AP) — The one thing most likely to conjure nightmares of the 2016 election night...