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Thursday, December 3, 2020
Culture Update: Food Fight: Texas vs. New Mexico

Update: Food Fight: Texas vs. New Mexico

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Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

RUSSELL CONTRERAS, Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Food critic Anthony Bourdain says he “got it wrong” when he dished out insults about the “World Famous” Frito pies sold at a well-known Santa Fe store.

Bourdain spokeswoman Karen Reynolds told The Associated Press on Monday that the food critic was incorrect in his description of the chile used by Santa Fe’s Five & Dime General Store’s snack bar to make the Frito pies.

The sharp-tongued chef and writer had said on a recent episode of CNN’s “Parts Unknown” that the store used Hormel Chili and a “day-glow orange cheese-like substance” to make their popular dish. Mike Collins, store manager of the Five & Dime, says the store uses chile grown in New Mexico.

Reynolds says the show will correct the description for future airings.  

The food critic wasn’t all negative toward New Mexico on the episode. Bourdain is seen driving through Route 66 in New Mexico and speaks of the famous highway’s different cultures and cornucopia of food. He also is shown enjoying some “level 3” green chile and having to “wait it out” while the spicy effects wear off.

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