81.4 F
Fort Worth
Thursday, October 1, 2020
- Advertisements -
Energy Energy Dept. welcomes fracking chemical disclosure

Energy Dept. welcomes fracking chemical disclosure

Other News

Closing prices for crude oil, gold and other commodities

The Associated Press Benchmark U.S. crude oil for September delivery rose 31 cents to settle at $41.60 a barrel Monday. Brent crude...

Trump to discuss energy, tour oil rig, raise money in Texas

By DARLENE SUPERVILLE Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump will shift his focus to American energy dominance during a stop in...

Basic Energy Services makes organizational changes

Fort Worth-based Basic Energy Services, Inc. (OTCQX: BASX) in late May announced the implementation of changes to the organizational structure of the...

Texas oil producers were cutting output before Railroad Commission chose not to, Commissioner Christi Craddick says

By Cassandra PollockMay 12, 2020 Texas Railroad Commissioner Christi Craddick on Tuesday doubled down on the agency’s recent decision...
Robert Francis
Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

KEVIN BEGOS, Associated Press MATTHEW DALY, Associated Press

PITTSBURGH (AP) — The U.S. Department of Energy said Friday that it welcomes the decision by oil and gas industry supplier Baker Hughes to disclose all chemicals in hydraulic fracturing fluid. But Halliburton, a major competitor in the field, isn’t committing to such disclosure.

Deputy Assistant Energy Secretary Paula Gant said that Baker Hughes’ move “is an important step in building public confidence” and the department “hopes others will follow their lead.”

The oil and gas industry has said the fracking chemicals are disclosed at tens of thousands of wells, but environmental and health groups and government regulators decry a loophole that allows companies to hide chemical “trade secrets.”

Houston-based Halliburton said Friday that it’s studying the move by Baker Hughes, which is also based in that city. Halliburton said it had an interest in protecting “our intellectual property and the substantial investment it represents” and will examine the new Baker Hughes format for its ability to protect such investments.

Baker Hughes said it now believes it’s possible to disclose 100 percent “of the chemical ingredients we use in hydraulic fracturing fluids without compromising our formulations,” to increase public trust.

Baker Hughes spokeswoman Melanie Kania wrote in an email that it will take “several months” for the new policy to take effect. She said the end result will be a “single list” that provides “all the chemical constituents” for frack fluids, with no trade secrets.

A boom in drilling has led to tens of thousands of new wells being drilled in recent years using the fracking process. A mix of water, sand and chemicals is forced into deep underground formations to break rock apart and free oil and gas. That’s led to major economic benefits but also fears that the chemicals could spread to water supplies.

The mix of chemicals varies by company and region — and some of the chemicals are toxic and could cause health problems in significant doses — so the lack of full transparency has worried landowners and public health experts.

Many companies voluntarily disclose the contents of their fracking fluids through FracFocus.org, a website partially funded by the oil and gas industry that tracks fracking operations nationwide. But critics say the website has loose reporting standards and allows companies to avoid disclosure by declaring certain chemicals as trade secrets.

___

Daly reported from Washington.  

- Advertisements -
- Advertisements -

Latest News

September sales tax revenue in Texas down 6.1% from a year ago

By Cassandra Pollock, The Texas Tribune Oct. 1, 2020 "September sales tax revenue in Texas down 6.1% from...

More than 100 recommendations made to improve Houston police

By JUAN A. LOZANO Associated PressHOUSTON (AP) — A task force in Houston which was appointed during this summer's nationwide protests over...

Journalist Bob Woodward says pandemic, economy will decide 2020 election

By Dan Rosenzweig-Ziff, The Texas Tribune Sept. 30, 2020 "Journalist Bob Woodward says pandemic,...

What to Know: Fort Worth gets mention in presidential debate – and mayor responds

If you watched the debate Tuesday night you might have noticed – amid all the name-calling – that moderator Chris Wallace dropped...

They wanted disruption in 2016. Now they’re Trump defectors

By TAMARA LUSH Associated PressShawna Jensen's moment of reckoning came in March, as she sat in her suburban Fort Worth living room...