38 F
Fort Worth
Monday, November 30, 2020
Government McAuliffe wins VA, Christie cruises in NJ

McAuliffe wins VA, Christie cruises in NJ

Other News

Exxon’s oil slick

Exxon Mobil is slashing its capital spending budget for 2020 by 30% due to weak demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and a market...

Folk music’s Mark Twain: 7 Essential tracks from John Prine,

NEW YORK (AP) — Some people, the songs just come out of them. For nearly half a century, they tumbled out of John Prine...

Tarrant County records another COVID-19 death

Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) on Wednesday, April 8 reported that a resident of Euless has died as the result of the COVID-19 virus....

Tradition stymied: A year unlike any since WWII for Augusta

The Masters is so intertwined with Augusta, they added an extra day to spring break.You see, the first full week of April isn't just...
Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

THOMAS BEAUMONT, Associated Press

Democrat Terry McAuliffe narrowly won the job of Virginia governor Tuesday, leading what Democrats hoped would be their first sweep of statewide offices in decades. In New Jersey, Republican Gov. Chris Christie cruised to re-election — on track for a large margin of victory — amid talk of a 2016 presidential run.

New Yorkers chose Bill de Blasio as mayor, electing the first Democrat since 1989.

In other, widely scattered odd-year balloting, Colorado was setting a tax rate for marijuana, Houston was deciding the fate of the Astrodome and Alabama Republicans were choosing between two of their own — from different wings of the party — in a special congressional runoff election in a conservative state.

Across the country, voters also chose sides in a host of local elections and ballot initiatives. Turnout was relatively light given that it was not a presidential or congressional election year.

Taken together, the results in individual states and cities yielded no broad judgments on how the American public feels about today’s two biggest national political debates — government spending and health care — which are more likely to shape next fall’s midterm elections.

Even so, Tuesday’s voting had local impact, and it mattered in ways big and small.

In Virginia, McAuliffe turned back a late-game push by state Attorney General Ken Cuccinnelli, a Republican. Both Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton made appearances for McAuliffe in the final weeks, and so did President Barack Obama over the weekend. The Democrat also dramatically outspent his GOP rival in TV ads in the final weeks.

Cuccinelli had sought to prove that a tea party-backed conservative could win the governorship of a swing-voting state. He brought big-name supporters to the state, too, including Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal — all potential presidential contenders.

Virginia Democrats hoped they were on their way to holding all statewide-elected offices for the first time since 1970 and turning back of the conservatism that has dominated for the past four years under one-term limited Gov. Bob McDonnell. The state’s two U.S. senators already are Democrats. Aside from McAuliffe, Democrats also won the lieutenant governorship. The race for the attorney general’s office was too close to call.

The race had turned McAuliffe’s way last month partly because of the partial government shutdown. Preliminary results of an exit poll conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks found that about a third of Virginia voters said they were personally impacted by the shutdown, and nearly half said Republicans deserved the blame for it.

Although Republicans were expected to hold the Legislature, Democrats also could break through Republicans’ veto-proof majority in the state House, and all that could set the stage of in a presidential battleground ahead of the next White House race.

Also with potential presidential overtones, Christie’s resounding victory was intended to send a message to the GOP that a Republican with an inclusive pitch could win in Democratic territory.

His triumph showed his ability to draw support from Democrats, independents and minorities. Much like George W. Bush did in his re-election race as governor in Texas in 1998, Christie now may have fodder to argue that that he is the most electable in what might well be a crowded presidential primary field.

Later this month, Christie assumes the chairmanship of the Republican Governors Association, giving him another platform for a possible national campaign.

Christie’s victory makes him the only Republican governor considering the presidency and serving with a Democratic legislature. He was opposed by state Sen. Barbara Buono.

Preliminary exit poll results in New Jersey suggest about that about half of New Jersey voters think Christie would make a good president, yet he would lag behind Hillary Clinton in a hypothetical 2016 matchup.

Elsewhere on Tuesday, the party’s internal squabbles played out in the special congressional runoff primary election in Alabama. It featured veteran politician Bradley Byrne, the choice of the GOP establishment, against tea party favorite Dean Young.

The race was the first test of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s promise to try to influence primaries. The group has pumped at least $200,000 into supporting Byrne, who has almost two decades in politics. Young argues that the Chamber endorsement is evidence that Byrne is the choice of big Washington interests.

Other races to watch:

—Big city mayors: In New York, de Blasio won handily over Republican Joe Lhota after Michael Bloomberg’s dozen-year tenure. Atlanta, Boston, Detroit, Minneapolis, Seattle and other cities also chose mayors.

—Washington state: Voters weighed in on a ballot issue over mandatory labeling of genetically modified food, a contest that has drawn hefty financial contributions in opposition from the likes of PepsiCo., Monsanto and General Mills, which last year spent $46 million to defeat a similar measure in California.

—Colorado: Colorado voters determined whether to tax marijuana at 25 percent and apply the proceeds to regulating the newly legalized drug and building schools. Voters in 11 rural counties were asked if they wanted to approve secession from the state. One county was talking about joining Wyoming.

___

Associated Press writers Bill Barrow and Christina Almeida Cassidy in Georgia, Kristen Wyatt in Colorado, Chris Grygiel in Washington state, Corey Williams in Michigan and Nedra Pickler in Washington contributed to this report.  


close






Oh hi there 👋
It’s nice to meet you.

Sign up to receive awesome content in your inbox.

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Latest News

JRB Fort Worth chosen for main operating base for C-130J aircraft

Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth has been selected as a main operating base for eight C-130J aircraft at the 136th Airlift...

Tarrant County DA’s office changing how it handles misdemeanor marijuna cases

The Tarrant County Criminal District Attorney’s Office is changing how it handles misdemeanor marijuana cases. The Tarrant County  Criminal District Attorney’s Office on Monday, Nov....

Arlington selects new police chief from Baltimore department

Col. Al Jones, a 25-year veteran of the Baltimore County Police Department, has been appointed the new police chief of the the City of...

GM flips to California’s side in pollution fight with Trump

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors says it will no longer support the Trump administration in legal efforts to end California’s right to set its...

Fort Worth out of running for Space Command HQ, San Antonio still in

A Texas city could still host the U.S. Space Command headquarters, but it’s not going to be Fort Worth. The U.S. Air Force has narrowed...