88.7 F
Fort Worth
Sunday, September 27, 2020
- Advertisements -
Government Perry won't add other items to special session agenda

Perry won’t add other items to special session agenda

Other News

Exxon’s oil slick

Exxon Mobil is slashing its capital spending budget for 2020 by 30% due to weak demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and a market...

Folk music’s Mark Twain: 7 Essential tracks from John Prine,

NEW YORK (AP) — Some people, the songs just come out of them. For nearly half a century, they tumbled out of John Prine...

Tarrant County records another COVID-19 death

Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) on Wednesday, April 8 reported that a resident of Euless has died as the result of the COVID-19 virus....

Tradition stymied: A year unlike any since WWII for Augusta

The Masters is so intertwined with Augusta, they added an extra day to spring break.You see, the first full week of April isn't just...
Robert Francis
Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Gov. Rick Perry said Thursday that he will not be adding any more items to the special legislative session currently underway in Austin, disappointing lawmakers who wanted more on the agenda.

Perry made the announcement while signing a bill that will allow students and teachers to use religious greetings in public schools.

“Everything has been added to the call that can be added from a time perspective,” Perry told reporters.

The governor initially called the Legislature into special session last month to adopt political maps drawn by a federal court. But in the last week he has added to the agenda, calling for stricter abortion laws, more highway funding and a new sentencing law for juveniles convicted of capital crimes.

Conservatives welcomed the addition of key, partisan issues such as restricting where, when and how women may undergo abortions. But conservatives also wanted expanded gun rights.

A large number of lawmakers also wanted him to add legislation concerning Tuition Revenue Bonds that would allow public universities to raise more money for construction projects.

Perry did not address any of those issues directly, pointing out that the House is not back until June 17 and will have only eight days to complete its work.

 

- Advertisements -
- Advertisements -

Latest News

After Ginsburg’s death, high stakes for Texas’ legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act

By Emma Platoff and Edgar Walters, The Texas Tribune Sept. 25, 2020 "After Ginsburg’s...

How it happened: From law professor to high court in 4 years

By ZEKE MILLER, COLLEEN LONG and MICHAEL BALSAMO Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — Four years ago, Amy Coney Barrett was a little-known law...

Texas senators support Supreme Court nominee

By Kelsey Carolan, The Texas Tribune Sept. 25, 2020 "President Donald Trump nominates Amy...

Trump taps ’eminently qualified’ Barrett for Supreme Court

By ZEKE MILLER, LISA MASCARO and MARY CLARE JALONICK Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to...

Probe into ‘discarded’ ballots becomes campaign outrage fuel

By CHRISTINA A. CASSIDY and MARK SCOLFORO Associated Press HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The news release from a U.S....