53.7 F
Fort Worth
Tuesday, December 1, 2020
Education Texas Senate takes first step toward school finance overhaul

Texas Senate takes first step toward school finance overhaul

Other News

Exxon’s oil slick

Exxon Mobil is slashing its capital spending budget for 2020 by 30% due to weak demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and a market...

Folk music’s Mark Twain: 7 Essential tracks from John Prine,

NEW YORK (AP) — Some people, the songs just come out of them. For nearly half a century, they tumbled out of John Prine...

Tarrant County records another COVID-19 death

Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) on Wednesday, April 8 reported that a resident of Euless has died as the result of the COVID-19 virus....

Tradition stymied: A year unlike any since WWII for Augusta

The Masters is so intertwined with Augusta, they added an extra day to spring break.You see, the first full week of April isn't just...

January 23, 2017

Leaders in the Texas Senate are vowing to find ways to overhaul the state’s school finance system, saying a recent Texas Supreme Court decision granted them a prime opportunity to shake up the heavily criticized status quo.  

On Monday, they announced the creation of a Senate budget working group — led by Friendswood Republican Larry Taylor — to tackle the issue. That group will work with the Senate Education Committee, which Taylor chairs, to propose replacements for the current school finance system.  

“The opportunity is huge for us to get it right,” said Jane Nelson, chairwoman of the Senate’s powerful Finance Committee. “We need a whole new method of school finance.”  

They’ll face an uphill climb in a session where legislators face several obstacles to major reform, not the least of which is money. The announcement comes a week after the Senate unveiled its preliminary budget, which did not include additional funding for public education. 

During the Finance Committee’s first hearing of the 2017 legislative session on Monday, Nelson, R-Flower Mound, advised the newly formed working group to “start with a clean slate” in recommending a new school finance scheme. “It should be less complicated, innovative and should meet the needs of our students,” she added. 

The current system funds Texas public school districts arbitrarily and inequitably across the state, and is held together by short-term fixes that have not been revisited in decades. Educators have repeatedly asserted the funding formulas do not provide them with enough money to meet the state’s academic standards.  

In May, the Texas Supreme Court upheld the state’s existing funding system as constitutional, and at the same time tasked state legislators with reforming it.  

“We’re left with a question mark as to what this effort will mean by the Senate,” said Lynn Moak, a school finance expert at the Austin-based consulting firm Moak, Casey & Associates. The main question is “whether they’re trying to reform school finance within existing dollars or looking for possible additional dollars to fund the system.” 

Nelson last week unveiled the Senate’s $213.4 billion two-year budget proposal, calling it a bare-bones starting point for financial discussions in what promises to be a particularly tight-fisted year. That proposal did not touch funding formulas for public education. 

The House’s base budget — also released last week — included an additional $1.5 billion that could be spent on public education only if the Legislature reforms the school finance system. 

Monday’s announcement signaled the Senate’s strong willingness to pursue an overhaul. Nelson called it one of the two most important issues facing the Finance Committee, along with addressing health care spending. She also appointed a working group to draw up proposals on containing fast-rising health care costs.  

The issues “deserve a deep dive,” she said, “and that begins today.” 

Some of her colleagues seemed skeptical that the school finance working group would be open-minded. Sen. John Whitmire, D-Houston, asked Taylor: “Are you willing to put everything on the table as an alternative to current funding mechanisms?” 

Taylor said yes — and called it a boon that the state Supreme Court did not force the state to come up with a specific plan to fix the school finance system. “They’ve actually cleared the air for us to come and do a meaningful reform,” Taylor said. 

The Texas Education Agency will testify before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday morning. 

This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at https://www.texastribune.org/2017/01/23/senate-working-group-tasked-school-finance-overhau/.


close






Oh hi there 👋
It’s nice to meet you.

Sign up to receive awesome content in your inbox.

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Latest News

A&M System Regents OK Tarleton Analytical Policing Institute

The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents has approved creation of Tarleton State University’s Institute for Predictive and Analytical Policing Sciences, a part...

NFR to feature 14 competitors with Tarleton connections

The 2020 edition of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association National Finals Rodeo has a distinct Tarleton State University flair, the university said in a...

U.S. Supreme Court leery of Trump’s bid to exclude undocumented immigrants from congressional reapportionment

Some Supreme Court justices on Monday seemed skeptical of President Trump’s claim he has the authority to exclude undocumented immigrants from population totals when...

Despite staggering pandemic losses, Texas budget forecast better than expected, state comptroller says

Despite “historic declines,” state lawmakers will have more money to work with in the upcoming legislative session than Comptroller Glenn Hegar expected over the...

Congress returns with virus aid, federal funding unresolved

WASHINGTON (AP) — After months of shadowboxing amid a tense and toxic campaign, Capitol Hill’s main players are returning for one final, perhaps futile,...