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Health Care Active Prostate Cancer Patient Shares His Treatment Journey

Active Prostate Cancer Patient Shares His Treatment Journey

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(BPT) – Throughout his 71 years, Ray Park has lived a full and active life. He spent 34 years serving in the United States Air Force, and in his off-time, kept busy playing golf, going on vacations and spending time with his family, including his wife of 46 years, Nancy.

On February 1, 2005, Ray retired from his job, and looked forward to continuing his active lifestyle. However, within two weeks, Ray was diagnosed with prostate cancer.

The diagnosis came as a shock. “I didn’t expect to have cancer,” he said. “My only reaction was that I wanted the cancer that was in my body, out. I had just retired. I had just started what I thought was a new chapter in my life, and it was worrisome.”

He began his treatment journey with surgery, which appeared to be working. As time passed, however, his prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level increased, signifying the disease was advancing.1 At this point, Ray’s doctor recommended radiation, which provided the same results. When the third treatment — hormone therapy — also failed, his doctor suggested he see a specialist.

Ray’s specialist explained his cancer had become non-metastatic castration-resistant (nmCRPC), which meant that it continued to progress despite hormone suppressive therapy.2 He suggested Ray participate in a clinical trial for a new medication that may help men living with this type of prostate cancer.

Experience with a New Treatment

NUBEQA® (darolutamide) was approved in July 2019 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is a prescription medicine used to treat men with prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body and no longer responds to a medical or surgical treatment that lowers testosterone.3

It is not known if NUBEQA is safe and effective in women and children. NUBEQA can harm unborn babies and cause loss of pregnancy. Men with female partners who may become pregnant should use birth control (contraception) during treatment and for 1 week after the last dose of NUBEQA.3

At first, Ray was hesitant given that his disease kept on progressing. However, he remained hopeful and with his wife in mind, he agreed to begin the trial.

Four months after treatment began, Ray went in for a check-up. “I remember how nervous Nancy and myself were going back for the four-month checkup.”

After completing the numerous scans and tests, the nurse came in to tell Ray about his positive results. “The elation that we felt. Maybe this is what is going to contain my cancer and keep it from spreading,” said Ray.

Ray cherishes every moment as he continues to spend time with his wife and granddaughter.

“This study has really given him so much hope, and he’s very optimistic about his future,” said Nancy. “He cherishes every day.”

This is the story of one cancer patient’s experience with NUBEQA. Not all patient experiences will be the same.

INDICATION

NUBEQA® (darolutamide) tablets is a prescription medicine used to treat men with prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body and no longer responds to a medical or surgical treatment that lowers testosterone.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

It is not known if NUBEQA is safe and effective in women and children. NUBEQA can harm unborn babies and cause loss of pregnancy. Men with female partners who may become pregnant should use birth control (contraception) during treatment and for 1 week after the last dose of NUBEQA.

Before taking NUBEQA, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

· have kidney or liver problems

· are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. NUBEQA can cause harm to your unborn baby and loss of pregnancy (miscarriage).

· have a partner who may become pregnant. Males who have female partners who may become pregnant should use effective birth control (contraception) during treatment and for 1 week after the last dose of NUBEQA. Talk with your healthcare provider about birth control methods.

· are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if NUBEQA passes into breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. NUBEQA may affect the way other medicines work and other medicines may affect how NUBEQA works.

You should not start or stop any medicine without talking to your healthcare provider that prescribed NUBEQA.

Most common side effects of NUBEQA include:

· Feeling more tired than usual

· Arm, leg, hand or foot pain

· Rash

· Decreased white blood cells (neutropenia)

· Changes in tests that determine how your liver works (liver function tests)

NUBEQA may cause fertility problems in males, which may affect the ability to father children. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have concerns about fertility.

These are not all the possible side effects of NUBEQA. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

For important risk and use information about Nubeqa, please see the full Prescribing Information.

©2019 Bayer. All rights reserved. BAYER, the Bayer Cross and NUBEQA® are registered trademarks of Bayer.

References

  1. Prostate Cancer Science Writers Guide. Whippany, NJ: Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, November 2017.
  2. Bayer in Prostate Cancer Fact Sheet Template. Whippany, NJ: Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals, November 2018.
  3. Nubeqa® (darolutamide) tablets [Prescribing Information]. Whippany, NJ: Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, July 2019.


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