61.5 F
Fort Worth
Friday, September 25, 2020
- Advertisements -
Government Justice Ginsburg says cancer has returned, but won't retire

Justice Ginsburg says cancer has returned, but won’t retire

Other News

Crowd jeers as Trump pays respects to Ginsburg at Supreme Court

KEVIN FREKING Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was booed Thursday as he paid respects to late...

Ginsburg remembered as prophet for justice, American icon

By MARK SHERMAN and MATTHEW BARAKAT Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — With crowds of admirers swelling outside, Supreme Court...

Some Dems, not yet Biden, talk of expanding Supreme Court

By MARK SHERMAN Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The prospect that President Donald Trump and Senate Republicans will fill...

Supreme Court vacancy rattles Susan Collins’ Senate race

By ALAN FRAM and DAVID SHARP Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — It's so on brand for Sen. Susan Collins...

By MARK SHERMAN and JESSICA GRESKO Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said Friday she is receiving chemotherapy for a recurrence of cancer, but has no plans to retire from the Supreme Court.

The 87-year-old Ginsburg, who has had four earlier bouts with cancer, said her treatment so far has succeeded in reducing lesions on her liver and she will continue chemotherapy sessions every two weeks “to keep my cancer at bay.”

“I have often said I would remain a member of the Court as long as I can do the job full steam. I remain fully able to do that,” Ginsburg said in a statement issued by the court.

Ginsburg, who was appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993, is the senior liberal justice on a court that leans conservative by a 5-4 margin. Her departure before the election could give President Donald Trump the chance to shift the court further to the right.

Asked earlier this week about a possible opening on the court before the election, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said the president would act quickly if any opening were to arise. Meadows commented after news that Ginsburg had  left the hospital after receiving treatment for an infection, which she said Friday was unrelated to the cancer.

“I can’t imagine if he had a vacancy on the Supreme Court that he would not very quickly make the appointment and look for the Senate to take quick action,” Meadows said, adding that he didn’t want any comment to be seen as wishing Ginsburg “anything but the very best.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has said that if there were to be a vacancy on the court during this year’s election cycle, the Republican-controlled Senate would likely confirm a nominee selected by Trump.

Ginsburg’s history with cancer goes back more than 20 years. She was treated without surgery for a tumor on her pancreas last year. She also underwent surgery for colorectal cancer in 1999, pancreatic cancer in 2009 and lung cancer in December 2018.

Ginsburg said she was disclosing her cancer treatment now because she is satisfied “that my treatment course is now clear.” She said immunotherapy treatments were not successful.

A medical scan in February revealed growths on her liver, she said, and she began chemotherapy in May.

“My most recent scan on July 7 indicated significant reduction of the liver lesions and no new disease,” she said. “I am tolerating chemotherapy well and am encouraged by the success of my current treatment.”

Ginsburg noted that she is able to “maintain an active daily routine” and that throughout her treatment she has “kept up with opinion writing and all other Court work.”

When the justices heard arguments via telephone in May because of the coronavirus pandemic, Ginsburg participated one day from a hospital room in Baltimore. She was being treated for gall stones, and said Friday that hospitalization also had nothing to do with the cancer.

- Advertisements -
- Advertisements -

Latest News

East Texas official arrested for alleged mail-in voter fraud involving 2018 Democratic primary for local seat

By Emma Platoff, The Texas Tribune Sept. 24, 2020 "East Texas official arrested for...

As part of revived federal death penalty, Christopher Vialva executed for Texas double murder

By Jolie McCullough, The Texas Tribune Sept. 24, 2020 "As part of revived federal...

Houston sampling wastewater to track spread of COVID-19By JUAN A. LOZANO Associated PressHOUSTON (AP) — Results from a program that's testing Houston's...

Fort Worth brokerage joins Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices

Longtime Fort Worth independent brokerage, Alexander Chandler Realty, will join Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, part of the HSF Affiliates LLC family of real...

Justice Dept. expected to file antitrust action vs. Google

By MICHAEL BALSAMO and MARCY GORDON Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is expected to bring an antitrust action against Google...