Wednesday, December 8, 2021
46.1 F
Fort Worth

Target Data Breach: What thieves do with stolen info

🕐 3 min read

Recent large-scale hacks at Target and Neiman Marcus are a reminder that credit card theft is a growing issue. Hackers find a way to install malware on point-of-sale devices, and then sit back as the credit and debit card numbers stream in. But who are those hackers, and what happens to the numbers next? Here’s a breakdown in four easy steps. (But don’t try this at home.)

Step 1: Build your criminal network The basic idea is that people use stolen credit cards to buy stuff. Sure. But if the same person stole the card numbers and bought the stuff, they would be easily caught. Instead, baddies create rings. There are the people who buy and sell card numbers in online markets, sometimes called “carding forums,” or “card malls.” There are the people who actually make fake cards. There are recruiters who find people to make purchases with the fake cards. And then there are the folks who actually go to stores carrying the counterfeit cards and attempt to make purchases. That’s a lot of people!

Step 2: Create your workflow The logistics must be worked out carefully. The counterfeiters need equipment to print the cards, which costs about $100. The people who buy and sell card numbers need to understand how the numbers are constructed, to get a good price for the numbers they have to sell, and to find good deals on working numbers – meaning those numbers that don’t yet look suspicious to financial institutions. Thousands of lousy card numbers will sell in a block for something like $20, but good numbers, like those stolen from Target, could sell for $135 each. The recruiters have to have contacts in the right places (a lot of cyber fraud originates in Eastern Europe, for example). And finally, the buyers need to feel confident looking a cashier in the eye. They must be trained in what can go wrong at the register and how to deal with it. (The buyers are also frequently the ones who resell the merchandise.)

Step 3: Buy stuff Once everyone is in place, it’s time to shop. Criminals use their stolen card numbers to buy items that can easily be flipped on websites like eBay. Luxury items, popular smartphones or anything else with high resale value is appealing. The bosses running these operations want to get as much money out of the goods as possible so they can pay for the equipment and “employees” involved in the operation and then pocket the rest.

Step 4: Keep a low profile The FBI and other law enforcement organizations in the U.S. and abroad often work undercover, posing as potential card-number buyers in forums or offering to use numbers to buy goods. In this way, they can begin to get a sense of who is involved, but only at the level of employees who are buying and selling numbers. Sometimes a low-level buyer also gets caught if he uses a fake card in a store and the cashier or bank identifies problems with the transaction. For example, fake cards often carry the stolen number on a magnetic strip, but have a dummy number on the card itself. To try to detect these types of fake cards, some stores require that the cashier enter the last four digits of the number on the card and flag the purchase if those four numbers don’t match the last four digits of the number being charged. In these schemes it can be difficult to identify the kingpin or group of leaders, but the criminals farther down the line are at higher risk of being caught. It doesn’t seem as if large-scale credit card hacks are going to stop any time soon. So if you get that fateful call from your bank, you’ll know that your card number is going down this rabbit hole.

Lily Hay Newman is a featured blogger for the online magazine Slate. This column was distributed by the Washington Post-Bloomberg News Service.  

Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

Related Articles

Our Digital Sponsors

Latest Articles

Fort Worth Business Press Logo
This advertisement will close in
00
Months
00
Days
00
Hours
00
Minutes
00
Seconds
seconds..
Click here to continue to Fort Worth Business Press

Not ready to subscribe?

Try a few articles on us.

Enter your email address and we will give you access to three articles a month, to give us a try. You also get an opportunity to receive our newsletter with stories of the day.

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Get our email updates

Stay up-to-date with the issues, companies and people that matter most to business in the Fort Worth.

  • Restaurants
  • Technology
  • and more!

FWBP Morning Brief

FWBP 5@5

Weekend Newsletter

  • Banking & Finance
  • Culture
  • Real Estate