50.9 F
Fort Worth
Saturday, October 31, 2020
Government City considers raising development fees to encourage online building applications

City considers raising development fees to encourage online building applications

Other News

Exxon’s oil slick

Exxon Mobil is slashing its capital spending budget for 2020 by 30% due to weak demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and a market...

Folk music’s Mark Twain: 7 Essential tracks from John Prine,

NEW YORK (AP) — Some people, the songs just come out of them. For nearly half a century, they tumbled out of John Prine...

Tarrant County records another COVID-19 death

Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) on Wednesday, April 8 reported that a resident of Euless has died as the result of the COVID-19 virus....

Tradition stymied: A year unlike any since WWII for Augusta

The Masters is so intertwined with Augusta, they added an extra day to spring break.You see, the first full week of April isn't just...

With the majority of Fort Worth developers submitting building applications on paper, the Fort Worth City Council is considering a fee for paper applications in an effort to get more developers to submit their plans online.

“We’re taking out the handling of the paper as much as possible,” Planning and Development Director Randle Harwood said.

The city council is expected to vote on the fee increases Tuesday. If approved, the changes will go into effect Oct. 1.

The city began taking online applications for permits, zoning and platting last year, Harwood said. So far, about 15 percent of developers have opted to take the digital route – not bad for the first year, Harwood said, but the city wants that number to grow.

To discourage paper submissions, the city plans to charge $25 for building permit applications, $50 for zoning applications and $50 for platting applications. All applications will be charged $5 to help pay for technology upgrades for the planning and development department.

The fee changes will bring in approximately $536,692 more revenue to the city, which will help pay for technology, additional staffing and operating costs, Harwood said.

The fee increases come as the city faces dramatic growth in development over the past six years. According to city data, 9,974 building permits were issued in fiscal year 2010. In fiscal year 2015, that number jumped to 11,272, with the city projecting to issue 12,026 permits by the end of fiscal year 2016. Plats and right-of-way applications are rising, too, jumping from 297 in fiscal year 2010 to 507 in fiscal year 2015, with 582 applications projected for fiscal year 2016.

“Our intent is to try to have growth pay for growth,” Harwood said. “The things that we do are services primarily to developers or individuals that allow them to have safe buildings and safe infrastructure that goes with that.”

Look for a more detailed report after the city council votes on Tuesday. 

Latest News

FWHS picks demolition contractor for Stop Six Choice Neighborhood Initiative

Fort Worth Housing Solutions has awarded a $2.8 million contract for the abatement and demolition of the former Cavile Place public housing...

Industrial park coming to Arlington

A logistics real estate giant is developing a master-planned industrial park in Arlington that could cost more than $65 million.

Pelosi, Trump administration trade blame over virus aid

By ANDREW TAYLOR Associated PressWASHINGTON (AP) — The major players in Washington's COVID-19 relief blame game lobbed familiar volleys on Thursday, marking...

Developer tied to Texas AG says feds tampered with warrants

By JAKE BLEIBERG Associated PRESSDALLAS (AP) — On a summer morning last year, FBI agents arrived at the home of a prominent...

Three Republicans file to run for speaker of the Texas House

By Cassandra Pollock, The Texas Tribune Oct. 29, 2020 "Three Republicans file to run...