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Thursday, October 22, 2020
Technology And then there were 3

And then there were 3

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A look at big issues on Supreme Court’s agenda

Some of the issues either already on the Supreme Court's docket when it begins its new session or likely to be before...

Wall Street posts solid gains after surge in corporate deals

By ALEX VEIGA and DAMIAN J. TROISE AP Business Writers Wall Street kicked off the week with a broad...

Tarrant County ranks low in work-from-home study by NAR

North Texas ranks pretty high in the “Work from Home” category, according to a just-released study by the National Association of Realtors....

Commentary: Universities and COVID-19: Charting turbulent times

Ray Perryman As the COVID-19 pandemic emerged this spring, college campuses across the United States swiftly sent students...

Persistence pays off, at least for T-Mobile. The magenta-clad wireless network is finally poised to acquire smaller rival Sprint after nearly a decade of trying. A federal judge effectively cleared the way for the companies to combine as early as April 1, after ruling Tuesday that a group of states challenging the deal had not done enough to prove that it would raise prices for consumers. The $26.5 billion deal will shrink the U.S. wireless market from four major providers to three, but also introduces satellite TV company Dish as a new wireless competitor — assuming Dish can get its act together and deliver on promises to build a next-generation, 5G cellular network.

The news is good for Sprint shareholders in the short term. Its stock spiked 78% on the day of the ruling. Cowen analysts say T-Mobile will reap benefits over the long term, though integration costs and risks will dampen the company’s stock in the short term. Customers won’t notice much change in their bills or cellular reception for at least a few years. The biggest losers in the foreseeable future? Market leaders Verizon and AT&T, which will have a larger rival to tackle.

Latest News

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Twitter CEO says it was wrong to block links to Biden story

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Linear Labs raises $6 million in new funding

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Five things to know about the Big Tech antitrust report

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Fort Worth among cities in Facebook voting project

Today is the last day to register to vote in Texas. On the same...