57.7 F
Fort Worth
Friday, November 27, 2020
Education BRIT, Tarleton State to map rare plants

BRIT, Tarleton State to map rare plants

Other News

A look at big issues on Supreme Court’s agenda

Some of the issues either already on the Supreme Court's docket when it begins its new session or likely to be before the justices...

Wall Street posts solid gains after surge in corporate deals

By ALEX VEIGA and DAMIAN J. TROISE AP Business Writers Wall Street kicked off the week with a broad rally Monday, clawing back much of...

Tarrant County ranks low in work-from-home study by NAR

North Texas ranks pretty high in the “Work from Home” category, according to a just-released study by the National Association of Realtors. But Tarrant...

Commentary: Universities and COVID-19: Charting turbulent times

Ray Perryman As the COVID-19 pandemic emerged this spring, college campuses across the United States swiftly sent students home in droves and switched to...

The Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT), Tarleton State University and the Texas Department of Transportation are partnering to find and protect rare plant species along TxDOT rights-of-way in 23 counties in the Waco and Austin districts of Central Texas.

Through a TxDOT grant, Tarleton and Fort Worth-based BRIT will research and build habitat maps for 57 of the 81 Edwards Plateau rare plant species. The work includes identifying, documenting and mapping areas where these rare species most likely occur. TxDOT will use these maps to improve the department’s ability to protect the rare species, which grow along Texas highways.

For several of these species, roadsides represent a significant portion of the known populations. Conserving these species in their roadside habitat is critical to their survival.

Darrel Murray, adjunct professor in Tarleton’s Department of Wildlife, Sustainability and Ecosystem Sciences, said the project is important from two standpoints.

“First,” he said, “from a collaboration standpoint, this project fits into the intent of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by Tarleton State University and BRIT in January of this year promoting common interests in education, research and service to the public. Second, from a conservation standpoint, if we locate rare plant species within TxDOT rights-of-way, these areas may be managed differently, with less disturbance, or with some form of mitigation.”

BRIT researchers will examine specimens of these plants on file in BRIT’s herbarium, noting species “habitat” and the geographical locations where the plants were found.

A Tarleton Geographic Information System specialist then will take the data and map and highlight potential locations where these plants most likely occur.

The research is expected to be completed, including site visits, by August 2017.


close






Oh hi there 👋
It’s nice to meet you.

Sign up to receive awesome content in your inbox.

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Latest News

Holiday trends to watch: Adult Play-Doh; stores that ship

NEW YORK (AP) — The pandemic is turning this into a holiday shopping season like no other. Toy companies are targeting stuck-at-home grown-ups with latte-smelling...

COMMENTARY: Student debt in a stimulus package is not a good solution

Making education more affordable and accessible is critical to our future, but simple, across-the-board debt forgiveness is not the best policy. Student debt has been...

Left for dead, twice, RadioShack gets another shot online

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — RadioShack, a fixture at the mall for decades, has been pulled from brink of death, again. It’s the most prized...

Literacy Accord of the city, the Fort Worth ISD and Read Fort Worth formalized

Read Fort Worth, Fort Worth ISD and the City of Fort Worth have reaffirmed their commitment to assuring that FWISD PK-3rd grade students continue...

A North Texas superintendent is openly defying the state mask mandate in schools. No one is stopping him.

At Peaster Independent School District, 40 miles northwest of Fort Worth, Superintendent Lance Johnson has said masks are optional in his school district buildings...