59.8 F
Fort Worth
Tuesday, October 20, 2020
Technology NASA honors Armstrong on moon landing anniversary

NASA honors Armstrong on moon landing anniversary

Other News

A look at big issues on Supreme Court’s agenda

Some of the issues either already on the Supreme Court's docket when it begins its new session or likely to be before...

Wall Street posts solid gains after surge in corporate deals

By ALEX VEIGA and DAMIAN J. TROISE AP Business Writers Wall Street kicked off the week with a broad...

Tarrant County ranks low in work-from-home study by NAR

North Texas ranks pretty high in the “Work from Home” category, according to a just-released study by the National Association of Realtors....

Commentary: Universities and COVID-19: Charting turbulent times

Ray Perryman As the COVID-19 pandemic emerged this spring, college campuses across the United States swiftly sent students...
Robert Francis
Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer

NASA honored one of its most famous astronauts Monday by renaming a historic building at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

It now bears the name of Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon when the Apollo 11 mission landed there 45 years ago.

Armstrong, who died in 2012, was remembered at a ceremony as not only an astronaut, but also as an aerospace engineer, a test pilot and university professor. Michael Collins, who orbited the moon as Armstrong took his historic steps on July 20, 1969, said he had a “powerful combination of curiosity and intelligence” along with an intuitive grasp of the complexities of flight machinery.

“Neil probably liked hangars better than office buildings, but he was certainly good in either venue,” Collins said.

NASA renamed the Operations and Checkout building, also known as the O&C, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. It has been the last stop for astronauts before their flights since 1965. It was also used to test and process Apollo spacecraft. Currently, it’s where the Orion spacecraft is being assembled to send astronauts to an asteroid and later to Mars.

The renaming ceremony included remarks by Apollo 11 crew member Buzz Aldrin and backup mission commander Jim Lovell. Armstrong’s sons Rick and Mark also spoke.

___

Online:

NASA: http://www.nasa.gov

Latest News

Twitter CEO says it was wrong to block links to Biden story

By KELVIN CHAN Associated Press Twitter was wrong to block weblinks to an unverified political story, CEO Jack Dorsey...

Linear Labs raises $6 million in new funding

Smarter energy company Linear Labs has raised an additional $6 million in funding to further develop manufacturing capabilities and grow its employee...

Five things to know about the Big Tech antitrust report

By The Associated Press After years of calling Big Tech too big, Democratic lawmakers are calling for Congress to rein in Facebook,...

Fort Worth among cities in Facebook voting project

Today is the last day to register to vote in Texas. On the same...

Jones family’s Blue Star group invests in Frisco fintech

There are plenty of Cowboy fans in North Texas, but the employees at Frisco-based Payrix, an industry leader in embedded fintech, probably...