63.4 F
Fort Worth
Thursday, October 1, 2020
- Advertisements -
Culture Netflix raising prices for 58M US subscribers as costs rise

Netflix raising prices for 58M US subscribers as costs rise

Other News

Wall Street posts solid gains after surge in corporate deals

By ALEX VEIGA and DAMIAN J. TROISE AP Business Writers Wall Street kicked off the week with a broad...

Tarrant County ranks low in work-from-home study by NAR

North Texas ranks pretty high in the “Work from Home” category, according to a just-released study by the National Association of Realtors....

Commentary: Universities and COVID-19: Charting turbulent times

Ray Perryman As the COVID-19 pandemic emerged this spring, college campuses across the United States swiftly sent students...

Two Fort Worth firms form strategic alliance

Mosaic Strategy Partners and SKM Communication Strategies form alliance After years of successful collaboration, two Fort Worth-based firms, Mosaic...

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix is raising its U.S. prices by 13 percent to 18 percent, its biggest increase since the company launched its streaming service 12 years ago.

Its most popular plan will see the largest hike, to $13 per month from $11. That option offers high-definition streaming on up to two different internet-connected devices simultaneously. Even at the higher price, that plan is still a few dollars cheaper than HBO, whose streaming service charges $15 per month.

The extra cash will help to pay for Netflix’s huge investment in original shows and films and finance the heavy debt it has assumed to ward off rivals such as Amazon, Disney and AT&T.

This marks the fourth time that Netflix has raised its U.S. prices; the last hike came in late 2017 . But this is the first time that higher prices will hit all 58 million U.S. subscribers, the number Netflix reported at the end of September.

Previously, Netflix had continued to offer a basic, $8-a-month streaming plan while raising rates on more comprehensive plans with better video quality and options to watch simultaneously on different devices.

This time, the price for the cheapest plan is going up to $9 per month. A premium plan offering ultra-high definition will jump to $16 per month from $14.

The new prices will immediately affect all new subscribers and then roll out to existing customers during the next three months. Customers in about 40 Latin America countries where Netflix bills in U.S. currency will also be affected, excepting key international markets such as Mexico and Brazil.

Netflix had nearly 79 million subscribers outside the U.S. as of September.

Higher prices could alienate subscribers and possibly even trigger a wave of cancelations. For instance, Netflix faced a huge backlash in 2011 when it unbundled video streaming from its older DVD-by-mail service, resulting in a 60 percent price increase for subscribers who wanted to keep both plans. Netflix lost 600,000 subscribers after that switch.

The company is now betting it can gradually raise its prices, bolstered by a string of acclaimed hits during that past five years that have included “House of Cards,” ”Orange Is The New Black,” ”Stranger Things,” ”The Crown” and, most recently, the film “Bird Box.”

“We change pricing from time to time as we continue investing in great entertainment and improving the overall Netflix experience,” the company said in a statement.

Consumers also have an increasing array of other streaming options .

Amazon offers a streaming service as part of its Prime shipping program for $13 per month, or $120 for an annual membership. Hulu sells an ad-free service for $12 per month. AT&T’s WarnerMedia unit plans a broader streaming service this year centered on HBO. Walt Disney is gearing up to launch a streaming channel this year.

With Apple also widely expected to join the video-streaming fray, the competition for programming is enabling top directors, writers and actors to charge more for their talents. That has intensified financial pressure on Netflix, which hasn’t been bringing in enough money to pay for all its programming and other business expenses.

The company burned through about $3 billion last year and is expecting to do so again this year. To offset the negative cash flow, Netflix has been borrowing heavily to pay for programming. The Los Gatos, California, company had accumulated nearly $12 billion in debt before borrowing another $2 billion in an October bond offering.

Concerns about the stiffening competition and Netflix’s ability to sustain its current leadership in video streaming has caused the company’s stock price to slide by 21 percent from its peak of $423.21 reached last June.

News of the price hike sent a charge into shares of Netflix Inc., which rose more than 5 percent in early trading, to $351.40.

- Advertisements -
- Advertisements -

Latest News

What to Know: The Top 100, a new CEO and making electricity

We’ve announced our initial Top 100 Honorees and we’re pleased to also announce plans to honor them...

The Fort Worth Business Press announces Top 100 2020 honorees

  It’s been a year of unprecedented challenges. But to everything there is a season and now is the...

Randstad US to bring 1,100 remote customer service and call center jobs to Texas

Randstad US (Https://www.randstadusa.com) has announced that it is hiring for 1,100 remote customer service representative jobs in Texas. Candidates looking for job...

Vision leases Airport Freeway location to OMG BBQ

Vision Commercial Real Estate on Sept. 28 announced Trenton Price, Senior Director at Vision Commercial, recently completed lease...

What to Know: Big day for openings in Fort Worth (and more java jokes)

It was a big day for real estate in Fort Worth Monday. First, Downtown...