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Tuesday, September 29, 2020
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Government Lawmakers look to finish road funding proposal

Lawmakers look to finish road funding proposal

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Robert Francis
Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Texas Senate and House could wrap up the second special session by approving a proposed constitutional amendment increasing funding for road and bridge construction.

Lawmakers meet Thursday. They may approve a conference committee reconciliation of separate transportation bills both chambers passed previously.

The proposals would each put to voters on a November ballot a constitutional amendment increasing funding for roads and bridges by at least $800 million annually.

But they differ on whether the extra money would come directly from the state’s Rainy Day Fund, or from oil and natural gas taxes that would then draw from the Rainy Day Fund to make up the difference.

There is also disagreement on whether the fund should have a $6 billion floor, below which it would no longer provide transportation funding.

 

 

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