46.8 F
Fort Worth
Sunday, November 29, 2020
Government New airline union boss says not afraid of strikes

New airline union boss says not afraid of strikes

Other News

Exxon’s oil slick

Exxon Mobil is slashing its capital spending budget for 2020 by 30% due to weak demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and a market...

Folk music’s Mark Twain: 7 Essential tracks from John Prine,

NEW YORK (AP) — Some people, the songs just come out of them. For nearly half a century, they tumbled out of John Prine...

Tarrant County records another COVID-19 death

Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) on Wednesday, April 8 reported that a resident of Euless has died as the result of the COVID-19 virus....

Tradition stymied: A year unlike any since WWII for Augusta

The Masters is so intertwined with Augusta, they added an extra day to spring break.You see, the first full week of April isn't just...
Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

DAVID KOENIG, AP Airlines Writer

DALLAS (AP) — The new leader of a major union in the airline industry says he’ll increase lobbying, oppose outsourcing, and help unions strengthen ties to local communities.

Harry Lombardo, who started out cleaning buses in Philadelphia in 1972, was elected president of the Transport Workers Union, or TWU, during its convention in Las Vegas, the union said Wednesday.

The 64-year-old replaces James C. Little, who led the union for seven years and tried to cooperate with American Airlines to limit concessions on pay and benefits, only to see the airline eliminate thousands of TWU jobs after it filed for bankruptcy protection. Lombardo announced in July that he would challenge Little, who then dropped from the race.

Lombardo said in an interview that he will take a more aggressive approach to labor-management relations during his four-year term. He said he will give union locals a bigger role in dealing with employers, train leaders to communicate better with the public, and step up lobbying in Washington and in politicians’ hometowns.

“The labor movement was successful in the ’50s and ’60s because (unions) were tied to the communities their workers lived in,” he said. “They’ve gotten away from that. We’re going to be very active in the community.”

One of Lombardo’s first actions will be leading a protest Thursday at the Las Vegas headquarters of Allegiant Air, where TWU won the right to represent about 600 flight attendants but hasn’t secured a contract in more than two years of bargaining. Its members have picketed and handed out leaflets in a bid to shame the company, but those efforts haven’t produced results.

Allegiant spokeswoman Jessica Wheeler said the company wants to reach an agreement. “The TWU is welcome to use their resources however they see fit,” she said of the protest, “but we believe our time is better spent attacking the issues at the negotiation table rather than attacking one another.”

Lombardo will continue TWU’s support for the merger of American Airlines and US Airways, which is being challenged by the federal government on grounds that it would restrict competition in the airline business and drive up prices.

TWU represents 130,000 workers at airlines and public transit agencies. Transit workers represented by other unions conducted a strike in July against the Bay Area Rapid Transit district in California and might walk off the job again in October, but federal law makes legal strikes very difficult in the airline industry.

Lombardo said strikes are a sign of failure by both labor and management but can be the union’s best approach for dealing with recalcitrant management. In Philadelphia, he led a 14-day transit workers’ strike in 1995.

“Is the TWU afraid of a strike?” he said. “Absolutely not.”

 

 


close






Oh hi there 👋
It’s nice to meet you.

Sign up to receive awesome content in your inbox.

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Latest News

JRB Fort Worth chosen for main operating base for C-130J aircraft

Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth has been selected as a main operating base for eight C-130J aircraft at the 136th Airlift...

Tarrant County DA’s office changing how it handles misdemeanor marijuna cases

The Tarrant County Criminal District Attorney’s Office is changing how it handles misdemeanor marijuana cases. The Tarrant County  Criminal District Attorney’s Office on Monday, Nov....

Arlington selects new police chief from Baltimore department

Col. Al Jones, a 25-year veteran of the Baltimore County Police Department, has been appointed the new police chief of the the City of...

GM to recall 7M vehicles globally to replace Takata air bags

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors will recall about 7 million big pickup trucks and SUVs worldwide to replace potentially dangerous Takata air bag inflators. The...

GM flips to California’s side in pollution fight with Trump

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors says it will no longer support the Trump administration in legal efforts to end California’s right to set its...