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Report: Plane engine sputtering before crash claims Dallas man

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AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Federal investigators say witnesses saw a plane’s engine sputtering and smoking before a fatal crash near an Austin airport.

The National Transportation Safety Board’s preliminary investigation report details the Sept. 10 crash that killed 55-year-old David Anderson of Dallas. His twin-engine plane crashed in a city-owned field north of Austin-Bergstrom International Airport.

He never made contact with the control tower. Witnesses say the plane was flying at a low altitude and making banging noises.

The plane struck two trees and ignited a three-acre brush fire. Anderson was pronounced dead at the scene.

 

Robert Francis
Robert is a Fort Worth native and longtime editor of the Fort Worth Business Press. He is a former president of the local Society of Professional Journalists and was a freelancer for a variety of newspapers, weeklies and magazines, including American Way, BrandWeek and InformatonWeek. A graduate of TCU, Robert has held a variety of writing and editing positions at publications such as the Grand Prairie Daily News and InfoWorld. He is also a musician and playwright.

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