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Take your keys: Vehicle thefts with keys inside rise with Texas, DFW at the top

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Dallas-Fort Worth, here’s some advice. Take your keys.

On every single day from January 1, 2016, through December 31, 2018, an average of 209 vehicles were stolen across the U.S. because drivers left their keys or fobs in their vehicles making them attractive targets for thieves. A report from the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) shows that during this three-year period, a total of 229,339 vehicles were stolen in this manner—a 56 percent increase since 2015. When including the numbers from 2013, that increase balloons to 88 percent.

Texas was No. 3 for states with most thefts with keys and the Dallas-Fort Worth area was No. 5 for the same.

NICB analysts reviewed data contained in the National Crime Information Center’s stolen vehicle file to produce this report. Records were queried using thefts with keys and similar variants as search criteria. The number of thefts with keys or fobs left inside may be substantially higher since many drivers don’t admit to making the mistake, and it’s not reported in the police report or insurance claim.

While national vehicle thefts have enjoyed a steep decline since 2003, in recent years, there have been some upticks in thefts; most notably in 2016 when 765,484 vehicles were reported stolen—an increase of 57,726 from 2015. According to today’s report, in that same year, 69,351 vehicles were stolen as a result of keys or fobs remaining in the vehicle. Had those complacency thefts not occurred, 2016 would have posted a decrease rather than an increase in annual vehicle thefts.

The top five states with the most thefts with keys during this period were: California (31,185), Florida (17,300), Texas (15,511), Ohio (12,596) and Nevada (11,391).

The top five Core-Based Statistical Areas (CBSA) with the most thefts with keys were: Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV (11,073); Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL (7,549); Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA (7,501); Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL (7,086); and Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX (6,603).

Warming and cooling vehicles seems to have played a part in these thefts since the most occurred in winter and fall. December was first with 22,155. It was followed by January (21,384), November (20,080), October (19,918) and July (19,811).

The top five specific dates with the most reported thefts were in January and December, with January having four of the five. January 1, 2018, was the top spot with 321 thefts. January 3, 2018, was next with 309 thefts, followed by January 5, 2018 (307), December 27, 2017 (299) and January 2, 2018 (296).

Reviewing day-of-week theft occurrence data, Monday was the preferred theft day with 34,948 thefts. Friday was next with 33,582, followed by Saturday (33,214), Sunday (32,100) and Tuesday (32,085).

“We can’t stress enough the importance of locking your vehicle and taking the key or fob with you when you leave it,” said NICB President and CEO Joe Wehrle. “Anti-theft technology works, but only if you use it.”

NICB advises drivers to:

• Lock the vehicle, set the alarm and take all keys or FOBS.

• Do not leave the garage door opener in the vehicle.

• Take a picture of your registration on your cell phone and do not leave the registration or other papers with personal information in the vehicle.

• Never leave a car unlocked and running to warm it up or while stopping for a quick cup of coffee. It only takes a moment for the opportunistic thief to jump inside and drive off.

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